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  • 30 Days to Better Guitar Playing

  • 30 Days to Better Guitar Playing



    • 30 days to better blues guitar ebook

      30 Days To Better Blues Guitar eBook $15.99


      In the 30 Days to Better Blues Guitar eBook you will find a month long practice routine with a lesson a day on a topic covering some of the basics and most fundamental principles of Blues Guitar playing. Each short lesson will improve your knowledge of soloing, licks, scales, arpeggios, chords, harmony, vibrato, accents, phrasing, ear training and sight reading.

      Download eBook Now...

  • b.b.king

    Lick of the Week: Thrill Is Gone by B.B.King

    B.B. King is widely regarded as the official King of Blues, so no study of Blues Guitar can be complete without a thorough knowledge of his playing style and repertoire. In the Lick this week we will be looking at the intro to one of B.B. Kings signature tunes and biggest hit Thrill is Gone from the 1970 Album Completely Well.

    Click here to read the full article.

  • stevie ray vaughan guitar

    5 Essential Boxes for Blues Guitar Soloing

    Learning how to improvise Blues solos and licks on the guitar requires an ability to be able to navigate the fretboard efficiently. One of the ways to achieve this essential Blues knowledge is to have a thorough understanding of scales and arpeggios so that you know exactly where to play as we move through a 12 Bar Blues progression.

    Click here to read the full article.

  • albert king

    Born Under a Bad Sign: 3 Essential Albert King Blues Licks

    Albert King is one of the most influential Blues players to have emerged. In this lesson we will look at a few licks and phrases from one of his biggest hits Born Under a Bad Sign.

    Click here to read the full article.

  • muddy and geneva waters

    Learning the Blues: 10 Essential Tips to Get You Started

    If you are a guitarist and you want to make a start at learning the Blues there are certain things that you can do to help prepare for your journey into Blues music.

    Click here to read the full article.

  • otis rush

    Blues Improvising Made Easy - 4 Note Solos

    There are many ways to improvise the Blues on the guitar but often what I like best about Blues players is when they keep it simple. There is a time and a place for playing loud and fast, for instance, but hearing B.B. King play on The Thrill Is Gone or Otis Rush on As the Years Go By keep in mind that Blues is about feeling and expression

    Click here to read the full article.

  • stevie ray vaughan

    Lick of the Week: Mary Had A Little Lamb by Stevie Ray Vaughan

    The lick for today is a 12 Bar Texas Blues Shuffle in E called Mary Had A Little Lamb by 80s Blues master and another of my favourite guitar players, Stevie Ray Vaughan. If you have yet to get into the Texas Flood album by SRV I advise you to do so right now.

    Click here to read the full article.

  • blues playlist

    The Essential blues Playlist

    Whilst putting together the lessons for my 30 Days to Better Blues Guitar eBook I listened to a vast selection of Blues music. So I thought I would begin to put a Playlist up here and keep adding to it as I go along.

    Click here to read the full article.

  • jimmy page guitar

    Lick of the Week: Gravity by John Mayer

    In this lesson we will be looking at how to play the intro to Gravity by John Mayer taken from the live version on the Live from Abbey Road EP.

    Click here to read the full article.

  • jimmy page guitar

    3 Essential Jimmy Page Blues Licks

    Jimmy Page, as well as being one my favourite guitarists is, without doubt, one of the most influential and well known guitarists ever to emerge. Page made solos that are unique and instantly recognizable due to a combination of his sound and trademark delivery. As well as creating those trademark Led Zeppelin riffs...

    Click here to read the full article.

  • greg martin guitar

    3 Cool Slow Blues Turnarounds

    Our first lick is a Ronnie Earl style Turnaround that works well over a slow blues or easy shuffle. I have written this in A although once you have it down practice it in all 12 keys.

    The C#m7-C9-Bm7-Bb7#9 fits over the last two bars of the 12 bar blues form.

    Click here to read the full article.

  • ronnie earl

    4 Must Know Ronnie Earl Blues Turnarounds

    Ronnie Earl was one of the finest guitarists to emerge during the 1980s. Primarily known for his work as a Blues guitarist he often crossed into Jazz whilst also incorporating elements of Soul and Rock.

    Click here to read the full article.

  • t bone walker

    Stormy Monday: How Jazz has Influenced the Blues

    Count Basie was a master when it came to swinging the Blues during the 1930s. With the clever use of chord substitutions by the guitarist in his orchestra, Freddie Green.

    Click here to read the full article.

  • jimi hendrix

    Riff of the Week: Long Hot Summer Night by Jimi Hendrix

    The riff of the week is the intro to Long Hot Summer Night from the 1968 Album Electric Ladyland and is one of my favourite of all Hendrix riffs.

    Click here to read the full article.

  • john mayer

    Riff of the Week: Belief by John Mayer

    The first riff of the week comes from vocalist and guitarist John Mayer and involves some really cool blues 6th slides across the 5th and 3rd strings and a little bit of thumb work on the 6th string.

    Click here to read the full article.

  • john mayer

    Using Minor to Major 3rds in Blues Soloing

    A real key element in blues playing is utilizing the Minor to Major 3rds. It is a method of playing introduced by some of the earliest Blues players like Big Bill Broonzy and Blind Lemon Jefferson and has since gone on to become a staple formula in blues guitar solos. What this means is that you can use notes from a Major and a Minor chord.

    Click here to read the full article.

  • big bill broonzy

    The Minor Blues Scale

    One of the most common scales used in modern popular music is the Minor Blues Scale. One of the reasons that this scale is so popular is because of its versatility, as it can be used to solo over a Major, Major 7th, Minor, Minor 7th and Dominant chords as well as sitting comfortably over Blues progressions.

    Click here to read the full article.

  • eric-clapton

    Blues Variations Part 1

    by Simon James

    The most typical blues structure is the 12 bar blues form where we play four bars on the 1, two bars on the 4, two bars on the 1, then one bar each on the 5, the 4, the 1 and the 5. So a blues in A will go as follows: four bars on A, two on D, two on A, one on E, one on D, one on A, one on E.

    Click here to read the full article.

  • b b king

    Blues Variations Part 2

    Variations in blues often can include making chromatic additions to the 12 bar form. Here are a few typical chord additions that you may come across in your blues studies.

    Click here to read the full article.